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Walk with the Word authors have provided several books, some of which are available free through online viewing or download, which also have print and Kindle eBook options, as well as those exclusively offered in print and Kindle formats.

"And Then The End Wll Come" by D. E. Isom

And Then The End Will ComeMany overlook the gap of time which the Early Church experienced of nearly sixty years between the Olivet Discourse and John’s vision on Patmos; their eschatology could not even possibly include Revelation. Strictly speaking, the very first generation was all but gone and the publication of Revelation actually came when the Church was firmly in the grip of its third generation of believers.

No mainstream author or scholar, even those belonging to competing eschatologies, disputes that the earliest Christians all expected Christ to return in their lifetime, and within that same group is usually found a common acceptance of the later date when John published Christ’s vision in comparison with the rest of the New Testament canon. But it then follows that this means the Early Church’s expectations for the Second Coming were first and foremost shaped by their understanding of the Olivet Discourse, the New Testament writings providing a commentary on it, and the Old Testament, and would have no parallel knowledge of how such things might be compared and contrasted to Revelation, a body of Scripture which was not revealed in the course of most of their lifetimes.

The question of what the Early Church believed concerning the eschaton is answered in that it was completely founded upon the Olivet Discourse. Since all but one Apostle died with no knowledge of Revelation, their writings obviously expound and explain the Olivet Discourse, not Revelation. This clarified for them the meaning of the Old Testament prior, and was what the New Testament writers were referring to which came immediately after. That their teachings would later fit Revelation is a testament to its divine authorship.
Furthermore, we need to consider seriously that when Revelation was initially distributed to the Church at large, its authenticity and authority would have therefore been tested against the Olivet Discourse (and the rest of Scripture, of course) and not the other way around. If those Christians could have created their own PowerPoint charts and websites depicting a consolidated End Times scenario to express their eschatology, the starting point would have been the Olivet Discourse. Only in this context would Revelation be first and foremost understood and even “integrated” with what they knew from that teaching, not the other way around as is presently so often the chosen approach regardless of the eschatology proffered. If it did not perfectly conform with Christ's initial teachings, it would have never been accepted as a member of canon.

During the past 30 or so years in particular, a growing number of scholars, teachers and pundits have put for the notion that the Olivet Discourse does not apply to the Church, but is intended exclusively for Israel in the wake of the Church’s promised removal. This work addresses the fact that for the first 60 or so years of the Church’s history, the only teaching the Apostles and Early Church possessed regarding Christ’s Return was the Olivet Discourse, and when Revelation finally came available, recognized it as an authentic member of the canon of Scripture only because it conformed to their understanding of the Olivet Discourse.

We need to engage in an exercise, as much as possible, to first study the Olivet Discourse without any reference to Revelation, and then take that structure and overlay it on that very last Christ-given work. Just as nothing in the twenty-six books prior to Revelation revise in even the smallest detail what was presented in the thirty-nine books of the Old Testament, neither did Revelation replace even the smallest point of the eschatological landscape for anything which preceded it. As it turns out, both are essential to properly understand the other as long as the sequence of their publication is consciously retained and not reversed to suit us.

"The Anti-King(dom)" by D. E. Isom

And Then The End Will ComeWhereas Revelation 13, like many passages in Scripture, primarily describe the Antichrist from the perspective of an individual, Revelation 17-18 provide a parallel description of him as a kingdom. As it turns out, this dual designation has been present in Scripture from the very first revelation of the anti-king. The biblical mandate where this figure is concerned is actually a two-sided coin where it is just as important to recognize him as an individual man as well as the embodiment of a kingdom. There are many historical and scriptural figures who are “antichrist” in nature, but only a specific set of conditions accompanies the ultimate, final fulfillment.

 

While there are previous portions of God’s prophetic Word which we now understand further illuminate and expand upon the initial vision of this figure provided in Daniel 2, in that first overt picture of the final ruler of the world we are provided a parallel image not just of an individual man as represented by the overall monument, but the fact that he is also a kingdom as represented by the various parts so assigned by the explanation of the vision. From this point on in Scripture God will continue to expand on both of these aspects. He is not just to be understood as a king, but a kingdom. This is the ultimate goal which God’s Word is trying to teach where the Antichrist is concerned; he is not just an individual counterfeit of Christ, but of the Body of Christ. And, ultimately, the anti-kingdom will literally form from a confederation of ten earthly kings/kingdoms with a heritage and character derived from this overall monument to earthly empires, but especially beholden to the nature of the Roman Empire, although as individually unique as each previous empire.

 

Just as we in the Body of Christ work to make ourselves individually, and the whole Bride of Christ collectively, more and more into the likeness of our Master by the exclusive working of His Word, so the followers of Antichrist mimic him. One brings us into eternal union with the Godhead, the other into eternal separation and damnation in the Lake of Fire. In the end, each is a direct reflection of the other.

 

For those who accept and practice His Word, this final series of events we collectively label as the Last Days is not as much of a mystery as many would like for us to believe. The truth for the practicing Christian is that everything God has provided in His Word will either be understood in advance or as it takes place and through Christ, as our Wisdom, it is only through Him that we comprehend the difference. But apart from Christ, nothing will be known until it is too late. In the meantime, we have an assignment to carry out which involves not just a king, but a kingdom.

"Biblical Love, Biblically Applied" by D. E. Isom

And Then The End Will Come Although there is a wealth of information in Scripture providing God’s definition of “love”, what is often over-looked is all that Scripture provides to show us how to actually achieve and practice that love. God’s Word does not merely tell us about love and set a standard, but follows through with how to actually achieve it. The commandment issued by Christ, “love one another, just as I have loved you” (Jn. 15:12) is followed up with what we are supposed to do to accomplish this seemingly impossible feat. As with all things authentically Christian, it has to do, of course, with our own personal treatment of God’s Word.

This book will definitely touch on some of the issues related to proper Bible study. This is evidenced in the title of its first chapter, “Is Your Bible Study Method Really Working?” But in the end the main issue ultimately addressed is how to determine if something or someone, especially ourselves, is authentically “Christian” and achieving biblical love. Even when, by all outward appearances, something appears to be classic, old school, Bible-consuming authentic, how do we know for sure it is functioning properly? What makes a Christian authentic and visibly standing apart from the many false religions, cults, and the myriad who simply claim to be a “Christian” as a demographic label rather than an expression of a life devoted to actually following Jesus? How can we be assured that the “Christian” people, places and things to which we have attached our self is on the right track? How do we know whether or not we’re allowing God’s Word to do the job intended?

I suppose this book can be thought of as a spiritual self-diagnostic, but it also serves as a cautionary tale that even when something has all the external appearances of orthodoxy and a requisite, biblically-based compliance, there is still a bottom line needing to be established, or at least well on its way to being developed. “How” we approach God’s Word may not actually be as important as first knowing for sure “why”. Most importantly, we will see that the Bible is not merely describing an ideal standard in Christ’s love, but offering the attainable approach to achieving that love in our own life.

"The Discipler's Commentary: The Gospel of Luke" by William Walthall
The Discipler's Commentary: The Gospel of Luke How can a Christian’s faith be built apart from the knowledge of God’s word? The answer is, “It can’t.” This commentary provides a tool for building faith. It is designed so that it can be used by an individual, by someone who is discipling another person one-on-one, or in a small group setting such as a Sunday school class or a home Bible study. Besides the commentary itself, study questions are provided for small group discussion, and fill-in-the-blank outlines are available for individual use or for groups. The outlines are useful primarily for the transfer of information and knowledge about the chapter being studied. They provide an overview of the contents of the chapter, with a few practical implications presented in order to apply personally the scriptural lessons in the text. The study questions are geared more in the direction of increasing critical thinking skills about the lessons from the text, and stimulating thinking about how to apply the scriptural lessons to one’s life, values, and relationships, both to God and to others.

In short, the purpose of this commentary is to make disciples who understand the teachings of Scripture and process those teachings in such a manner that the result is changed values and changed behavior, particularly in the realm of relationships. Only then does one become a true disciple of Jesus Christ.

"The Discipler's Commentary: The Gospel of Luke Workbook"
The Discipler's Commentary: The Gospel of LukeThis is a companion workbook specifically designed for the use of those being led through this exhaustive inductive study of the Gospel of Luke. For each chapter, space for note taking is provided along with the same fill-in-the-blanks handout provided in the Leader's Guide.
"Elijah To Come" by D. E. Isom

"Elijah To Come"“Why do the scribes say that Elijah must come first?” (Mt. 17:10)

 

This book specifically addresses the proposal that just as Elisha picked up where Elijah left off with a "double portion" of his spirit, the "Elijah to come" will pick up in the Second Coming to complete what John the Baptist in the character of Elijah began, but with a "double portion" replaying the continuation of Elisha. The point where both John the Baptist and Elijah ended their ministries on the other side of the Jordan, Elisha so begins, and replays a series of spiritual events mirroring Joshua's literal conquest of Israel. Elisha has to deal with the issue of the rapture, the cleansing of the waters at Jericho, persecution because of Elijah's rapture, and several following events, all of which metaphorically speak of reconciling Israel spiritually with her Messiah through the restoration of the Word.

 

Whereas most orthodox conservative Evangelical commentators are in near universal agreement that a revival among ethnic Israel is a key feature of God's prophetic Word which must still take place, there is no consensus as to who, when or how this will come about. Although many favor scenarios involving either the 144,000 sealed in Revelation 7 or the Two Witnesses of Revelation 11 assuming the lead in these roles, the only figure in Scripture who is specifically assigned this task is Elijah. While Elijah's ministry parallels that of John the Baptist in the First Coming, Elisha assumes the mantle and immediately mirrors what "Elijah to come" will transact in the Second Coming. In other words, the life and ministry of John the Baptist reflects his role in the First Coming, and just as he picked up and finished that ministry, Elisha characterizes this role in the Second Coming, yet with a “double portion” of effectiveness to fully complete what was initially begun where Israel is concerned.

"The Love Revelation" by Willaim Walthall

"The Love Revelation" "Book 1: The Royal Law “

To experience and express God’s love is what biblical truth is all about. Biblical truth always points to love.”

In The Love Revelation, Dr. Walthall introduces the reader to a new genre of Christian literature: witty and poignant fiction woven into the fabric of easily digested teaching about biblical love.

Walthall begins by asking the question, “Where does love come from?” After showing that love cannot be the result of human evolution or creativity, he demonstrates that love comes only through God’s revelation as expressed in the Bible. He traces God’s revelation of love from before creation all the way into the New Testament, culminating in the person and work of Jesus Christ. The early church clearly understood that it was a privilege as well as the responsibility of each and every Christian to both experience and express God’s love revelation. This expression was called “the royal law.”

"Revelation: The Final View" by D. E. Isom
"Elijah To Come"

Consider the fact that all the books of the New Testament, except Revelation as the very last, were written before Jerusalem’s destruction between approximately 34-70 ad. For the first 35 or so years of the Church, the main text all Christians relied on was the Old Testament, and then when these new writings came along and could finally be copied and distributed (which took years if not decades longer), think about what it would take for them to accept a brand new addition to Scripture after another 25 year interim of textual silence.

And this is a much trickier scenario than we might think, because at this time there has been a catastrophic rise in counterfeit gospels and a Jewish literary phenomenon so prolific that it is categorized as “apocalyptic literature”; in other words, counterfeit writings in the style of Revelation. How did they distinguish the one authentic one from the myriad of counterfeits? Precisely because it conformed to the rest of God’s Word, and in particular to Daniel and the Olivet Discourse. If Revelation had altered, replaced, or rendered obsolete any previous teaching of God’s written Word, it would have never been accepted for the authentic canon of Scripture which it is.

Sadly, this is not the case with so many at present. Confusion and conflict profligate among those who, for one reason or another, attempt to either section off parts of God’s Word to elevate them in isolation from the rest, or diminish the necessary priority of those prophetic texts which came before Revelation and are critical for its right handling. Many seem to treat Revelation as if it is the only prophetic text.

For those who by faith are committed to the whole counsel of God’s Word, it quickly becomes clear that, as with all things, confusion is brought about by human hands, but clarity comes by willful submission to the Holy Spirit for the whole. In "And THEN The End Will Come" we established the foundation of the Olivet Discourse, in "The Anti-King(dom)" we built upon the essential visions provided in Daniel, and now in "The Final View" these are leveraged in an inductive commentary of Revelation.

"WordWalk" by D. E. Isom
"Elijah To Come"

This is a selection of thirty slightly updated monthly commentaries originally published on the Walk with the Word website over the course of the past 15 years. Employing the same use of the Inductive Study Approach as all of the Bible studies provided at Walk with the Word, these are mainly topics of biblical doctrine as they relate to both the individual believer and the Church at large.

"The Amos Study Guide: Personal Edition" by D. E. Isom

"The Amos Study Guide: Personal Edition"This is not a commentary, but a series of Bible studies employing the Inductive Study Approach in order to arrive at a knowledge of how the text should be personally applied to one’s life. Formatted in a question and answer format, it facilitates the process of observation—what does the text say, interpretation—what does the text mean, and the ultimate goal of application—how should I personally apply the text to my life.

What may be most relevant about the book of Amos is how closely the times and situation of that time mirror what is taking place in the Church—at least, the Western Church, at present. Without ever using the term, this is a very deep and parallel teaching on the meaning of “apostasy”—those who have fallen away spiritually from what at one time they embraced. In far too many congregations, organizations and even denominations, the authentic practices and teachings of God’s Word have been replaced even while the terms and labels have been retained; what is called “worship” has become entertainment; what is called “religion” is a host of variations on self-indulgence and personal pleasure. The names and terms and labels are all used to call it “Christianity” or even “Evangelicism”, but such fall short of the true, biblical definitions, while the proof of the people’s shortfalls are evident in the stark absence of the required spiritual fruit. “Christian” has become little more than a demographic as their actual behavior can no longer be distinguished from, and at times is even more egregious, than their non-believing secular counterparts. Amos is one of the most relevant historical patterns being replayed at present and provides an inside look into the working and nature of the apostasy already incipiently underway which characterizes the early stages of the Last Days.

Now as then, the repeated call has gone out of the imminent return of the Lord, but those most familiar with the message do not merely continue unchanged, but are frequently found to actually twist it into something more palpable for their own pleasure. This is a picture of stubborn willfulness to cling to whatever pleases one’s self no matter what, of possessing the Word but choosing to ignore or twist it, not of a people completely ignorant of God’s Word and ways. It would be like a generation who knew exactly what Noah was doing and what was coming, but ignoring the rain and rising water even up to the point where God’s hand shut the door. Amos provides devastating insight into the working of those who know better, but still don’t really care, a large slice of the modern Church with whom we find ourselves struggling with today.

This title is also available in print, as well as “The Walk with the Word Amos Study Guide (Small Group/Seminar Leader Edition)” to present this material in eight consecutive lessons, and the accompanying “The Walk with the Word Amos Study Guide Workbook” in which participants can keep notes in parallel to each study.

"The Amos Study Guide: Leader's Edition" by D. E. Isom

"The Amos Study Guide: Leader's Edition"This is not a commentary, but a series of Bible studies employing the Inductive Study Approach in order to arrive at a knowledge of how the text should be personally applied to one’s life. Formatted in a question and answer format, it facilitates the process of observation—what does the text say, interpretation—what does the text mean, and the ultimate goal of application—how should I personally apply the text to my life. The Walk with the Word Amos Study Guide (Small Group/Seminar Leader Edition) presents this material in eight consecutive lessons. The question and answer format is designed for the group leader to facilitate a discussion not of what the text “means to me”, but rather seeking how to put God’s Word into practice. Study aids such as a tri-fold brochure of the Inductive Study Approach, and group fill-in-the-blanks handouts are included.

What may be most relevant about the book of Amos is how closely the times and situation of that time mirror what is taking place in the Church—at least, the Western Church, at present. Without ever using the term, this is a very deep and parallel teaching on the meaning of “apostasy”—those who have fallen away spiritually from what at one time they embraced. In far too many congregations, organizations and even denominations, the authentic practices and teachings of God’s Word have been replaced even while the terms and labels have been retained; what is called “worship” has become entertainment; what is called “religion” is a host of variations on self-indulgence and personal pleasure. The names and terms and labels are all used to call it “Christianity” or even “Evangelicism”, but such fall short of the true, biblical definitions, while the proof of the people’s shortfalls are evident in the stark absence of the required spiritual fruit. “Christian” has become little more than a demographic as their actual behavior can no longer be distinguished from, and at times is even more egregious, than their non-believing secular counterparts. Amos is one of the most relevant historical patterns being replayed at present and provides an inside look into the working and nature of the apostasy already incipiently underway which characterizes the early stages of the Last Days.

Now as then, the repeated call has gone out of the imminent return of the Lord, but those most familiar with the message do not merely continue unchanged, but are frequently found to actually twist it into something more palpable for their own pleasure. This is a picture of stubborn willfulness to cling to whatever pleases one’s self no matter what, of possessing the Word but choosing to ignore or twist it, not of a people completely ignorant of God’s Word and ways. It would be like a generation who knew exactly what Noah was doing and what was coming, but ignoring the rain and rising water even up to the point where God’s hand shut the door. Amos provides devastating insight into the working of those who know better, but still don’t really care, a large slice of the modern Church with whom we find ourselves struggling with today.

Also Available:
The Walk with the Word Amos Study Guide Workbook
The Walk with the Word Amos Study Guide (Personal Edition)

"The Amos Study Guide: Workbook" by D. E. Isom
"The Ecclesiastes Study Guide Workbook"This is the companion workbook to “The Walk with the Word Amos Study Guide (Small Group/Seminar Leader Edition)”. It is formatted for group participants to not just take notes during each of the eight overall lessons, but includes the study aid summarizing “The Inductive Bible Study Method” as a tri-fold brochure to be kept in one’s Bible.

Also available is “The Walk with the Word Ecclesiastes Study Guide (Personal Edition)” for those seeking self-study or a personal review after participating in a group study.
"The Ecclesiastes Study Guide: Personal Edition" by D. E. Isom

"The Ecclesiastes Study Guide: Personal Edition"This is not a commentary, but a series of Bible studies employing the Inductive Study Approach in order to arrive at a knowledge of how the text should be personally applied to one’s life. Formatted in a question and answer format, it facilitates the process of observation—what does the text say, interpretation—what does the text mean, and the ultimate goal of application—how should I personally apply the text to my life.

Whereas the other books of the Bible assigned to members of the “Wisdom Literature” present Western readers with the challenge of navigating the literary devices of Hebrew poetry, Ecclesiastes has an ordered structure which genuinely unfolds in a very logical progression over its twelve chapters. Although not perfectly aligned with the Western addiction to an ordered format in the character of a set of instructions for operating machinery, it nonetheless progresses through the necessary increments, arriving at a very biblical conclusion. Its structure is not so different from the Epistles, and similarly embracing the theme of daily Christian living, is probably the closest Old Testament book in that respect.

At the end of all the analysis, this is a treatise on coming to terms with the fact that this life is finite and will only be successively navigated by the full trust in and dependence upon God. The examination of this mortal life by even the most wise and learned man in history to that point only served to prove that knowledge must always and ultimately give way to faith. The achievement of that realization produces the ability to therefore enjoy what God has given for the time allotted without incurring additional baggage for what will inevitably come next.

Each of these studies, as with all which are found on Walk with the Word, were created using the Inductive Bible Study (IBS) method. This is why the overall format of each lesson comes in the form of questions which prod exploration and examination of the text. When employed in a teaching environment, the leader acts more as a facilitator by asking the questions and guiding the discussion so as to involve the participants in an exercise wherein they are being discipled to properly handle Scripture in parallel with self-examination. These studies are not intended to simply convey information as a result of the author’s research or presentation, but for participants to actively seek and realize for themselves what needs to be put into practice from God’s Word. In other words, this is not a study of literature, but an exercise in discipleship.

This title is also available in print, as well as “The Walk with the Word Ecclesiastes Study Guide (Small Group/Seminar Leader Edition)” to present this material in ten consecutive lessons, and the accompanying “The Walk with the Word Ecclesiastes Study Guide Workbook” in which participants can keep notes in parallel to each study.

"The Ecclesiastes Study Guide: Leader's Edition" by D. E. Isom
"The Ecclesiastes Study Guide: Leader's Edition"

This is not a commentary, but a series of Bible studies employing the Inductive Study Approach in order to arrive at a knowledge of how the text should be personally applied to one’s life. Formatted in a question and answer format, it facilitates the process of observation—what does the text say, interpretation—what does the text mean, and the ultimate goal of application—how should I personally apply the text to my life.

Each of these studies, as with all which are found on Walk with the Word, were created using the Inductive Bible Study (IBS) method. This is why the overall format of each lesson comes in the form of questions which prod exploration and examination of the text. When employed in a teaching environment, the leader acts more as a facilitator by asking the questions and guiding the discussion so as to involve the participants in an exercise wherein they are being discipled to properly handle Scripture in parallel with self-examination. These studies are not intended to simply convey information as a result of the author’s research or presentation, but for participants to actively seek and realize for themselves what needs to be put into practice from God’s Word. In other words, this is not a study of literature, but an exercise in discipleship.

Whereas the other books assigned to members of the “Wisdom Literature” present Western readers with the challenge of navigating the literary devices of Hebrew poetry, Ecclesiastes has an ordered structure which genuinely unfolds in a very logical progression over its twelve chapters. Although not perfectly aligned with the Western addiction to an ordered format in the character of a set of instructions for operating machinery, it nonetheless progresses through the necessary increments, arriving at a very biblical conclusion. Its structure is not so different from the Epistles in this respect either.

At the end of all the analysis, this is a treatise on coming to terms with the fact that this life is finite and will only be successively navigated by the full trust in and dependence upon God. The examination of this mortal life by even the most wise and learned man in history to that point only served to prove that knowledge must always and ultimately give way to faith. The achievement of that realization produces the ability to therefore enjoy what God has given for the time allotted without incurring additional baggage for what will inevitably come next.

The Walk with the Word Ecclesiastes Study Guide (Small Group/Seminar Leader Edition) presents this material in ten consecutive lessons. The question and answer format is designed for the group leader to facilitate a discussion not of what the text “means to me”, but rather seeking how to put God’s Word into practice. Study aids such as a bookmark of the outline of Ecclesiastes, a study brochure of the Inductive Study Aproach, and group fill-in-the-blanks handouts are included.

"The Ecclesiastes Study Guide: Workbook" by D. E. Isom
"The Ecclesiastes Study Guide Workbook"This is the companion workbook to “The Walk with the Word Ecclesiastes Study Guide (Small Group/Seminar Leader Edition)”. It is formatted for group participants to not just take notes during each of the eight overall lessons, but includes study aids. These are included in the appendices detailing “The Inductive Bible Study Method”, “Ecclesiastes Study Preparations”, and a “Ecclesiastes Study Bookmark” to keep in one’s Bible.

Also available is “The Walk with the Word Ecclesiastes Study Guide (Personal Edition)” for those seeking self-study or a personal review after participating in a group study.
"The Parallel Gospels" by D. E. Isom
"The Ecclesiastes Study Guide Workbook"No consolidation of the Gospels can substitute for the individual study of each Gospel because the valuable context of each of those writings will be lost. A "harmony" or parallel format has to be treated for the most valuable thing that it really is, which is a supplemental study tool. And, of course, a study tool created by a mortal, not an infallible work provided by the hand of the divine. Like all its predecessors from history past, this is really more of an exercise which probably every serious Bible student needs to pursue personally.

As with all things when it comes to God’s Word, it is never a test limited to knowledge alone, but always dedicated to the greater issue of faith. The committed believer in Christ is not looking for the exceptions or the differences, but the multi-layered confirmations by the Holy Spirit of the greater application of God’s Word and ways to our personal walk. Hopefully this will be accepted as just that sort of study aid.
"The Psalm 119 Study Guide: Personal Edition" by D. E. Isom

"The Psalm 119 Study Guide: Personal Edition"

This is not a commentary, but a series of Bible studies employing the Inductive Study Approach in order to arrive at a knowledge of how the text should be personally applied to one’s life. Formatted in a question and answer format, it facilitates the process of observation—what does the text say, interpretation—what does the text mean, and the ultimate goal of application—how should I personally apply the text to my life.

Even within most books dedicated to the subject of hermeneutics and associated overall approaches, Psalm 119 as the definitive word on the Word found within the Word is largely ignored. This is not to say that any or all of those approaches are wrong, but rather to suggest that they may not be the best starting point. Psalm 119 is not a whole, contained system in and of itself when it comes to God’s Word, but it is, unquestionably, the foundational starting point. There is a reason it should grab our attention as the largest chapter in the whole Bible; everything else proceeds from here. What follows is a complete inductive study on the whole of Psalm 119 for each of its twenty-two, eight verse lessons synchronized to the letters of the Hebrew alphabet, each dedicated to an individual aspect of the working of God’s Word.

These studies are not intended to simply convey information as a result of the author’s research or presentation, but for participants to actively seek and realize for themselves that which needs to be put into practice from God’s Word. This is why the overall format of each lesson comes in the form of questions which prod exploration and examination of the text. The question and answer format facilitates a deeper personal discussion which is actually an exercise in discipleship to properly handle Scripture in parallel with self-examination.

The psalmist is actually providing twenty-two teachings set in real life as examples of the working of Scripture, or at least how it should be allowed to work, on a very practical level. The examples and accompanying discussion are never theoretical, clinical, nor in any way some kind of distant academic conjecture. The purpose behind the whole collective Word of God is not solely limited to just information, instruction, nor even inspiration, but has as its ideal goal incarnation—that is, taking the Word of God to the level of the heart so as to result not only in changed living, but changed relationships. It is to become an actual part of us.

Also available is “The Walk with the Word Psalm 119 Study Guide (Small Group/Seminar Leader Edition)” to present this material in eight consecutive lessons, and the accompanying “The Walk with the Word Psalm 119 Study Guide Workbook” in which participants can keep notes in parallel to each study.

"The Psalm 119 Study Guide: Leader's Edition" by D. E. Isom
"The Psalm 119 Study Guide: Leader's Edition"

This is not a commentary, but a series of Bible studies employing the Inductive Study Approach in order to arrive at a knowledge of how the text should be personally applied to one’s life. Formatted in a question and answer format, it facilitates the process of observation—what does the text say, interpretation—what does the text mean, and the ultimate goal of application—how should I personally apply the text to my life.

Even within most books dedicated to the subject of hermeneutics and associated overall approaches, Psalm 119 as the definitive word on the Word found within the Word is largely ignored. This is not to say that any or all of those approaches are wrong, but rather to suggest that they may not be the best starting point. Psalm 119 is not a whole, contained system in and of itself when it comes to God’s Word, but it is, unquestionably, the foundational starting point. There is a reason it should grab our attention as the largest chapter in the whole Bible; everything else proceeds from here. What follows is a complete inductive study on the whole of Psalm 119 which can be undertaken either personally or suitable for leading a small group or Sunday School class. This leader’s edition presents the whole of Psalm 119 in eight contiguous lessons with accompanying handouts and study aids for participants in a seminar, small group, or Sunday School class setting.

These studies are not intended to simply convey information as a result of the author’s research or presentation, but for participants to actively seek and realize for themselves that which needs to be put into practice from God’s Word. This is why the overall format of each lesson comes in the form of questions which prod exploration and examination of the text. When employed in a teaching environment, the leader acts more as a facilitator by asking the questions and guiding the discussion so as to involve the participants in an exercise wherein they are being discipled to properly handle Scripture in parallel with self-examination.

The psalmist is actually providing twenty-two teachings set in real life as examples of the working of Scripture, or at least how it should be allowed to work, on a very practical level. The examples and accompanying discussion are never theoretical, clinical, nor in any way some kind of distant academic conjecture. The purpose behind the whole collective Word of God is not solely limited to just information, instruction, nor even inspiration, but has as its ideal goal incarnation—that is, taking the Word of God to the level of the heart so as to result not only in changed living, but changed relationships. It is to become an actual part of us.

Also available is “The Walk with the Word Psalm 119 Study Guide Workbook” in which participants can keep notes in parallel to each study, and a “Personal Edition” for those not needing to lead a group and seeking only self-study.

"The Psalm 119 Study Guide Workbook"
"The Psalm 119 Study Guide Workbook

This is the companion workbook to “The Walk with the Word Psalm 119 Study Guide (Small Group/Seminar Leader Edition)”. It is formatted for group participants to not just take notes during each of the eight overall lessons, but includes study aids. These are included in the appendices detailing “The Inductive Bible Study Method”, “Psalm 119 Study Preparations”, and a “Psalm 119 Study Bookmark” to keep in one’s Bible.

Also available is “The Walk with the Word Psalm 119 Study Guide (Personal Edition)” for those seeking self-study or a personal review after participating in a group study.


"The Zechariah Study Guide: Personal Edition" by D. E. Isom

"The Psalm 119 Study Guide: Personal Edition"

This is not a commentary, but a series of Bible studies employing the Inductive Study Approach in order to arrive at a knowledge of how the text should be personally applied to one’s life. Formatted in a question and answer format, it facilitates the process of observation—what does the text say, interpretation—what does the text mean, and the ultimate goal of application—how should I personally apply the text to my life.

Something the reader of Zechariah has to pay attention to is that which applies to the original historical situation of Zechariah’s day, that which was foretold through Zechariah and fulfilled in the course of Christ’s First Coming, and that which still has a future anticipated fulfillment in the Second Coming. The local historical conflicts involving Jerusalem and Judah have a much greater, ultimate realization in what is referred to over and over again in the text of Zechariah as “that day”—that is, what we know to be the closing stages of the 70th Week of Daniel as it culminates and then initiates the Millennial Reign of Christ. In the process of God’s literal redemption of Jerusalem, the land and the people comes their spiritual redemption, so that ultimately as all these take their place in His Millennial Kingdom and everything meets God’s standards of finally being “HOLY TO THE LORD”. (Zech. 14:20)

This is something which can be leveraged in our personal application of the Scriptures contained in Zechariah. We need to not only understand that God is in control and has a plan in spite of how current circumstances appear to us, and that He has a much greater purpose and plan which is future to our current work, but intrinsically building upon it. Faithfulness to His Word and ways in the present have are not only impactful on others—especially future generations, but on our own spiritual destiny as well. But our own agenda is to live so as to be biblically qualified as “holy to the Lord”.

Another is to note that as they are building the Temple of God—which in the New Testament economy is now the Body of Christ, there is not simply the requirement that we live in obedience to His Word and ways in order to properly serve and worship, but provide an example to those called from afar to also come and worship. The literal demands placed upon Israel as an example to the Gentiles is a basis for the self-examination of believers in their witness and role to the unsaved at present.

Also Available in Print: The Walk with the Word Zechariah Study Guide (Small Group/Seminar Leader Edition) The Walk with the Word Zechariah Study Guide Workbook

"The Zechariah Study Guide: Leader's Edition" by D. E. Isom
"The Psalm 119 Study Guide: Leader's Edition"

This is not a commentary, but a series of Bible studies employing the Inductive Study Approach in order to arrive at a knowledge of how the text should be personally applied to one’s life. Formatted in a question and answer format, it facilitates the process of observation—what does the text say, interpretation—what does the text mean, and the ultimate goal of application—how should I personally apply the text to my life. The Walk with the Word Zechariah Study Guide (Small Group/Seminar Leader Edition) presents this material in eleven consecutive lessons. The question and answer format is designed for the group leader to facilitate a discussion not of what the text “means to me”, but rather seeking how to put God’s Word into practice. Study aids such as a tri-fold brochure of the Inductive Study Approach, and group fill-in-the-blanks handouts are included. The leader is encouraged to copy and distribute the fill-in-the-blanks outline to participants, pausing to do so at each major point in the study to do so. The participants then have an outline to review when they revisit the Scripture covered.

Also Available in Print:
The Walk with the Word Zechariah Study Guide (Personal Edition)
The Walk with the Word Zechariah Study Guide Workbook

"The Zechariah Study Guide Workbook"
"The Psalm 119 Study Guide Workbook

This is the companion workbook to “The Walk with the Word Zechariah Study Guide (Small Group/Seminar Leader Edition)”. It is formatted for group participants to not just take notes during each of the eight overall lessons, but includes study aids. These are included in the appendices.

Also Available in Print:
The Walk with the Word Zechariah Study Guide (Personal Edition)
The Walk with the Word Zechariah Study Guide Workbook

"The Walk"
This is the founding document for Walk with the Word. It is a short book explaining not only the importance of personal Bible study in the role of each individual's personal faith, but offers suggestions on how to synchronize the study of God's Word throughout all the ministries of the local church.