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Walk with the Word authors have provided several books, some of which are available free through online viewing or download, which also have print and Kindle eBook options, as well as those exclusively offered in print and Kindle formats.

"And Then The End Wll Come" by D. E. Isom

And Then The End Will ComeMany overlook the gap of time which the Early Church experienced of nearly sixty years between the Olivet Discourse and John’s vision on Patmos; their eschatology could not even possibly include Revelation. Strictly speaking, the very first generation was all but gone and the publication of Revelation actually came when the Church was firmly in the grip of its third generation of believers.

No mainstream author or scholar, even those belonging to competing eschatologies, disputes that the earliest Christians all expected Christ to return in their lifetime, and within that same group is usually found a common acceptance of the later date when John published Christ’s vision in comparison with the rest of the New Testament canon. But it then follows that this means the Early Church’s expectations for the Second Coming were first and foremost shaped by their understanding of the Olivet Discourse, the New Testament writings providing a commentary on it, and the Old Testament, and would have no parallel knowledge of how such things might be compared and contrasted to Revelation, a body of Scripture which was not revealed in the course of most of their lifetimes.

The question of what the Early Church believed concerning the eschaton is answered in that it was completely founded upon the Olivet Discourse. Since all but one Apostle died with no knowledge of Revelation, their writings obviously expound and explain the Olivet Discourse, not Revelation. This clarified for them the meaning of the Old Testament prior, and was what the New Testament writers were referring to which came immediately after. That their teachings would later fit Revelation is a testament to its divine authorship.
Furthermore, we need to consider seriously that when Revelation was initially distributed to the Church at large, its authenticity and authority would have therefore been tested against the Olivet Discourse (and the rest of Scripture, of course) and not the other way around. If those Christians could have created their own PowerPoint charts and websites depicting a consolidated End Times scenario to express their eschatology, the starting point would have been the Olivet Discourse. Only in this context would Revelation be first and foremost understood and even “integrated” with what they knew from that teaching, not the other way around as is presently so often the chosen approach regardless of the eschatology proffered. If it did not perfectly conform with Christ's initial teachings, it would have never been accepted as a member of canon.

During the past 30 or so years in particular, a growing number of scholars, teachers and pundits have put for the notion that the Olivet Discourse does not apply to the Church, but is intended exclusively for Israel in the wake of the Church’s promised removal. This work addresses the fact that for the first 60 or so years of the Church’s history, the only teaching the Apostles and Early Church possessed regarding Christ’s Return was the Olivet Discourse, and when Revelation finally came available, recognized it as an authentic member of the canon of Scripture only because it conformed to their understanding of the Olivet Discourse.

We need to engage in an exercise, as much as possible, to first study the Olivet Discourse without any reference to Revelation, and then take that structure and overlay it on that very last Christ-given work. Just as nothing in the twenty-six books prior to Revelation revise in even the smallest detail what was presented in the thirty-nine books of the Old Testament, neither did Revelation replace even the smallest point of the eschatological landscape for anything which preceded it. As it turns out, both are essential to properly understand the other as long as the sequence of their publication is consciously retained and not reversed to suit us.

 

"The Discipler's Commentary: The Gospel of Luke" by William Walthall
The Discipler's Commentary: The Gospel of Luke How can a Christian’s faith be built apart from the knowledge of God’s word? The answer is, “It can’t.” This commentary provides a tool for building faith. It is designed so that it can be used by an individual, by someone who is discipling another person one-on-one, or in a small group setting such as a Sunday school class or a home Bible study. Besides the commentary itself, study questions are provided for small group discussion, and fill-in-the-blank outlines are available for individual use or for groups. The outlines are useful primarily for the transfer of information and knowledge about the chapter being studied. They provide an overview of the contents of the chapter, with a few practical implications presented in order to apply personally the scriptural lessons in the text. The study questions are geared more in the direction of increasing critical thinking skills about the lessons from the text, and stimulating thinking about how to apply the scriptural lessons to one’s life, values, and relationships, both to God and to others.

In short, the purpose of this commentary is to make disciples who understand the teachings of Scripture and process those teachings in such a manner that the result is changed values and changed behavior, particularly in the realm of relationships. Only then does one become a true disciple of Jesus Christ.


"The Discipler's Commentary: The Gospel of Luke Workbook"
The Discipler's Commentary: The Gospel of LukeThis is a companion workbook specifically designed for the use of those being led through this exhaustive inductive study of the Gospel of Luke. For each chapter, space for note taking is provided along with the same fill-in-the-blanks handout provided in the Leader's Guide.
"Elijah To Come" by D. E. Isom

"Elijah To Come"“Why do the scribes say that Elijah must come first?” (Mt. 17:10)

 

This book specifically addresses the proposal that just as Elisha picked up where Elijah left off with a "double portion" of his spirit, the "Elijah to come" will pick up in the Second Coming to complete what John the Baptist in the character of Elijah began, but with a "double portion" replaying the continuation of Elisha. The point where both John the Baptist and Elijah ended their ministries on the other side of the Jordan, Elisha so begins, and replays a series of spiritual events mirroring Joshua's literal conquest of Israel. Elisha has to deal with the issue of the rapture, the cleansing of the waters at Jericho, persecution because of Elijah's rapture, and several following events, all of which metaphorically speak of reconciling Israel spiritually with her Messiah through the restoration of the Word.

 

Whereas most orthodox conservative Evangelical commentators are in near universal agreement that a revival among ethnic Israel is a key feature of God's prophetic Word which must still take place, there is no consensus as to who, when or how this will come about. Although many favor scenarios involving either the 144,000 sealed in Revelation 7 or the Two Witnesses of Revelation 11 assuming the lead in these roles, the only figure in Scripture who is specifically assigned this task is Elijah. While Elijah's ministry parallels that of John the Baptist in the First Coming, Elisha assumes the mantle and immediately mirrors what "Elijah to come" will transact in the Second Coming. In other words, the life and ministry of John the Baptist reflects his role in the First Coming, and just as he picked up and finished that ministry, Elisha characterizes this role in the Second Coming, yet with a “double portion” of effectiveness to fully complete what was initially begun where Israel is concerned.

 

"The Love Revelation" by Willaim Walthall

"The Love Revelation" "Book 1: The Royal Law “

To experience and express God’s love is what biblical truth is all about. Biblical truth always points to love.”

In The Love Revelation, Dr. Walthall introduces the reader to a new genre of Christian literature: witty and poignant fiction woven into the fabric of easily digested teaching about biblical love.

Walthall begins by asking the question, “Where does love come from?” After showing that love cannot be the result of human evolution or creativity, he demonstrates that love comes only through God’s revelation as expressed in the Bible. He traces God’s revelation of love from before creation all the way into the New Testament, culminating in the person and work of Jesus Christ. The early church clearly understood that it was a privilege as well as the responsibility of each and every Christian to both experience and express God’s love revelation. This expression was called “the royal law.”

"The Psalm 119 Study Guide: Personal Edition" by D. E. Isom

"The Psalm 119 Study Guide: Personal Edition"Even within most books dedicated to the subject of hermeneutics and associated overall approaches, Psalm 119 as the definitive word on the Word found within the Word is largely ignored. This is not to say that any or all of those approaches are wrong, but rather to suggest that they may not be the best starting point. Psalm 119 is not a whole, contained system in and of itself when it comes to God’s Word, but it is, unquestionably, the foundational starting point. There is a reason it should grab our attention as the largest chapter in the whole Bible; everything else proceeds from here. What follows is a complete inductive study on the whole of Psalm 119 for each of its twenty-two, eight verse lessons synchronized to the letters of the Hebrew alphabet, each dedicated to an individual aspect of the working of God’s Word.

These studies are not intended to simply convey information as a result of the author’s research or presentation, but for participants to actively seek and realize for themselves that which needs to be put into practice from God’s Word. This is why the overall format of each lesson comes in the form of questions which prod exploration and examination of the text. The question and answer format facilitates a deeper personal discussion which is actually an exercise in discipleship to properly handle Scripture in parallel with self-examination.

The psalmist is actually providing twenty-two teachings set in real life as examples of the working of Scripture, or at least how it should be allowed to work, on a very practical level. The examples and accompanying discussion are never theoretical, clinical, nor in any way some kind of distant academic conjecture. The purpose behind the whole collective Word of God is not solely limited to just information, instruction, nor even inspiration, but has as its ideal goal incarnation—that is, taking the Word of God to the level of the heart so as to result not only in changed living, but changed relationships. It is to become an actual part of us.

Also available is “The Walk with the Word Psalm 119 Study Guide (Small Group/Seminar Leader Edition)” to present this material in eight consecutive lessons, and the accompanying “The Walk with the Word Psalm 119 Study Guide Workbook” in which participants can keep notes in parallel to each study.

"The Psalm 119 Study Guide: Leader's Edition" by D. E. Isom
"The Psalm 119 Study Guide: Leader's Edition"

Even within most books dedicated to the subject of hermeneutics and associated overall approaches, Psalm 119 as the definitive word on the Word found within the Word is largely ignored. This is not to say that any or all of those approaches are wrong, but rather to suggest that they may not be the best starting point. Psalm 119 is not a whole, contained system in and of itself when it comes to God’s Word, but it is, unquestionably, the foundational starting point. There is a reason it should grab our attention as the largest chapter in the whole Bible; everything else proceeds from here. What follows is a complete inductive study on the whole of Psalm 119 which can be undertaken either personally or suitable for leading a small group or Sunday School class. This leader’s edition presents the whole of Psalm 119 in eight contiguous lessons with accompanying handouts and study aids for participants in a seminar, small group, or Sunday School class setting.

These studies are not intended to simply convey information as a result of the author’s research or presentation, but for participants to actively seek and realize for themselves that which needs to be put into practice from God’s Word. This is why the overall format of each lesson comes in the form of questions which prod exploration and examination of the text. When employed in a teaching environment, the leader acts more as a facilitator by asking the questions and guiding the discussion so as to involve the participants in an exercise wherein they are being discipled to properly handle Scripture in parallel with self-examination.

The psalmist is actually providing twenty-two teachings set in real life as examples of the working of Scripture, or at least how it should be allowed to work, on a very practical level. The examples and accompanying discussion are never theoretical, clinical, nor in any way some kind of distant academic conjecture. The purpose behind the whole collective Word of God is not solely limited to just information, instruction, nor even inspiration, but has as its ideal goal incarnation—that is, taking the Word of God to the level of the heart so as to result not only in changed living, but changed relationships. It is to become an actual part of us.

Also available is “The Walk with the Word Psalm 119 Study Guide Workbook” in which participants can keep notes in parallel to each study, and a “Personal Edition” for those not needing to lead a group and seeking only self-study.

"The Psalm 119 Study Guide Workbook"
"The Psalm 119 Study Guide Workbook"

This is the companion workbook to “The Walk with the Word Psalm 119 Study Guide (Small Group/Seminar Leader Edition)”. It is formatted for group participants to not just take notes during each of the eight overall lessons, but includes study aids. These are included in the appendices detailing “The Inductive Bible Study Method”, “Psalm 119 Study Preparations”, and a “Psalm 119 Study Bookmark” to keep in one’s Bible.

Also available is “The Walk with the Word Psalm 119 Study Guide (Personal Edition)” for those seeking self-study or a personal review after participating in a group study.


"The Walk"
This is the founding document for Walk with the Word. It is a short book explaining not only the importance of personal Bible study in the role of each individual's personal faith, but offers suggestions on how to synchronize the study of God's Word throughout all the ministries of the local church.